Food4ThoughtWellness

Nutrition for Body and Soul

Avocado-Tahini Dressing

This looks like a yummy dressing out of the book, “Wild About Greens!”

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Avocado-Tahini Dressing

Makes about 1 1/2 cups…enough for 12 to 16 ounces of cooked greens, plus extra!

Pour this rich sauce over steamed or wilted greens, or any salad of raw greens.

1 medium ripe avocado, peeled and diced

1/3 cup tahini (sesame paste)

Juice of 1 lemon

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

2 to 4 T. minced fresh parsley or cilantro, to taste

Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and puree until smooth.  Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of water, as needed, to achieve a medium-thick consistency.

Stir 1/2 to 1 cup of the sauce into greens once they are done.  Transfer the rest to a covered container and refrigerate.  Use within 3 days!

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Summer Time Salads

Came across this yummy sounding salad in my cookbook…”The Complete Idiot’s Guide for Anti-Inflammation Cooking”…

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Red Cabbage with Apple Slaw

Makes approx. 8 cups

4 cups red cabbage, cut into 1-in. pieces

2 medium Organic Golden Delicious apples, cored and cubed

2 medium carrots, sliced

2 T. unsweetened dried cranberries

1/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1 T Dijon-style mustard

1/4 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1.  In a large bowl, combine cabbage, apples, carrots, and cranberries.

2.  In a small bowl. whisk together olive oils, vinegar mustard, salt, and pepper.  Add to salad and toss to coat.   Serve at once or refrigerate, covered, for 2 to 24 hours.

I try to buy all of my produce Organic.. See an earlier post on the Clean Fifteen and Dirty Dozen for a little guidance.

** If your local grocery store doesn’t stock unsweetened dried cranberries, look for them at a health-food grocer.  I get mine at Trader Joe’s.

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The Tree of Life!!

I know I have posted on Moringa Oleifera before, but it is so worth repeating! This amazing botanical superfood has more benefits than you even know!  I am so glad that I have made Moringa a part of my daily health routine!  And, I am so glad to have those that I love including it in theirs!

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The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. – See more at: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html#sthash.QtMXiNdY.dpuf

However, not all Moringa is created equal….

Thank you Dr. Plant for all of your caring and knowledge!

There are five key points that are critical in ensuring the highest possible quality of Moringa.
1) Species:
There are 13 different species of the Moringa genus, each specie differs widely in it’s nutritional content and value. Moringa oleifera, is claimed to be the most nutritiously dense through numerous scientific publications.
2) Sourcing:
Additionally to Moringa oleifera being the most nutritiously dense of all the Moringa genus, Moringa oleifera’s nutritional value also depends on where it is grown, and when it is harvested. Several studies, including thesis work from prominent universities has shown this. Look for a company that sources their Moringa oleifera from India near the base of the Himalayas, numerous data points to this as the ideal location for maximizing Moringa’s nutritional impact.
3) Preparation:
There are several ways in preparing Moringa oleifera for consumption. The most nutritiously advantageous way is to shade dry the moringa leaves, this helps to naturally preserve and enrich for Moringa’s inherent nutrition. The second, and much more common way, is to dry the moringa in the sun. Though cheaper and quicker the ultra-violet radiation from the sun can crosslink the nutrients rendering them inert for physiological benefit.
4) Blend:
Moringa oleifera is a tree, and with that the nutritional power of the Moringa’s nutrition is found in different parts of the tree. For example, the leaves are enriched in amino acids, while the seeds are enriched in the essential fatty acids, and finally the fruit contains the powerful minerals critical for cell to cell communication. To maximize the nutritional power of Moringa oleifera, one must look to these three components.
5) Manufacturing:
Manufacturing can create havoc on natural products. It is often in this step that many natural botanicals loose their effectiveness. To overcome these challenges one must look to a company whose manufacturing is NSF certified, thereby giving greater confidence that they are adhering to practices that allow for quality found throughout the manufacturing process.

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Enjoy this short YouTube documentary on Moringa Oleifera!

Contact me for more info or visit my website… http://www.lwalling.myameo.com

When I became a part of Améo Essential Oils, never in my wildest dreams, did I think I would find such an amazing botanical superfood in addition to all of the wonderful Clinical Grade essential oils!  Thank you Zija/Améo/Ripstix!

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A Little Food 4 Thought!

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Green Goodness Salad Dressing

Weather’s looking nice….time for some salads!!  This recipe from Nava Atlas..looks yummy and refreshing!  Thanks Nava!

Greens

Green Goodness Salad Dressing

Makes about 1 1/2 cups….

Greens….the stars of this recipe…make a delicious dressing for mixed greens, grain or bean salads.  It’s also tasty drizzled on lightly cooked or roasted vegetables.

1/2 cup EVOO

1/2 cup peeled, seeded, and chopped cucumber

1/2 cup firmly packed fresh parsley

2 good handfuls of baby spinach leaves

2 T lemon juice (or a drop of Améo lemon essential oil)

2 T. white or red wine vinegar

1 T. chopped fresh dill, or 1 tsp. dried dill

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Place all ingredients in the container of a food processor.  Process until all that remains of the parsley is tiny flakes.  Refrigerate the unused portion in an airtight container.  Use within 2 days.

Enjoy!

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Spinach or Arugula & Miso Pesto

This is a recipe out of Wild About Greens, Thank you Nava Atlas, it looks delish!

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Spinach or Arugula & Miso Pesto

Makes about 1 1/2 cups, enough for about 6 servings

The twist on this classic pesto recipe is the substitution of spinach or arugula for the customary basil, which, though yummy, turns brown quickly.  Miso is a salty paste of fermented soybeans (available at any natural food grocery, I get mine at Sprouts), makes a good nondairy stand-in for Parmesan cheese.

10 to 12 ounces spinach or arugula (regular or baby varieties), well rinsed

1/2 cup firmly packed fresh parsley leaves

1/4 cup pine nuts or walnuts

2 T. evoo

1 to 2 T. lemon juice, to taste (drop of lemon essential oil works well too!)

2 T. white miso, more or less to taste

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Freshly ground pepper to taste

Steam the greens until just wilted.  When cool enough to handle, squeeze out as much moisture as possible.  Combine greens with the remaining ingredients in the container of a food processor.  Process until the mixture is coarsely pureed.  Use at once and refrigerate any leftovers in an airtight container, where they’ll keep for 2 to 3 days.

Enjoy!

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What’s in Your Fridge???

It’s Throw Together Thursday!!!

I had Organic boneless, skinless chicken thighs…

2 peppers

one onion

Arugula

Tarder Joe’s taco seasoning…(a little goes a long way, one pack lasts me through 5 or 6 dinners, and I like things hot… so beware!)

Coconut oil

Saute the peppers and onion in coconut oil. (The steam fogged my lens…ha!)

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When getting close to done add the arugula (spinach or kale would be good too!)

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Let the arugula wilt, then add the chicken and sprinkle the seasoning over the top.  The chicken cooks quickly!

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Eat alone or serve it over quinoa, or put it in a tortilla with some black beans…use whatever you have, make it easy!

Enjoy!!!

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Throw Together Thursdays!!

Sometimes I like to throw everything into one pot… Clean up is easier and so is the cooking!  Chop, then set it and forget it!!

First…open your fridge…hopefully there’s something in it worthwhile.  Chop..place in pot..season..cover and bake!

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Luckily I had chicken in the freezer that defrosts quickly!  I also had…mushrooms, brussels sprouts, beets, carrots, and a sweet potato!  Added a couple dollops of coconut oil, and season with your favorite seasonings.  Bake at 375* covered, approximately 45 minutes (depends on your oven).  Enjoy!  It was great for a rainy evening! Can you believe we had rain in California!!

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The 10 Most Functional Foods In The World Which Destroy Cancer Cells

Do you include any of these foods in your diet? Check out this link! 

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Organic or Not… You Decide!

Don’t think Organic makes much of a difference…  Too much money… Well, watch this!  The Organic Effect

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